Insights

Kina Advisory provides insights on topical issues facing the industry today as companies operate and invest in Africa. Read through our latest thought pieces that give an insight into Kina’s way of thinking, as we discuss ideas that challenge the way business in Africa is conducted, offer solutions to those challenges and highlight the success of others.

 

Investing in Africa | Relieving African data poverty

06|06|2016

There is a poverty of accurate and reliable information about society and economics in African countries. And it is affecting the growth and prosperity of those nations.  Timely, reliable and relevant statistics can be used to improve every aspect of life, from fundamentals like people’s health, nutrition and education, through to governance, business and investment. Speak to any potential investor into Africa and you will find that one of the major drawbacks to investing is always the dearth of reliable data.

A measure of success or failure

Even gross domestic product (GDP) figures for many African countries cannot be relied upon, due to the suspect nature of the underlying data. In his book Poor Numbers: How We Are Misled by African Development Statistics and What to Do About It, Morten Jerven says that African GDP data are affected by serious problems of reliability, accuracy and volatility. If you cannot even measure GDP reliably, then there is little hope of building a long-term strategy for development and growth in Africa. Take the UN’s new sustainable development goals. It doesn’t matter how noble the intentions or socially transformative the goals, they mean nothing if you cannot reliably measure a country’s progress towards achieving those goals.

Mining data in Africa

The question is: just what can African governments do to reverse this data poverty? The answer lies in working with academic and research institutions, the private sector – particularly in the technology world – and NGOs to form robust institutions, systems and processes for the collection and aggregation of both national data and statistics, and statistics from the informal sector. Governments need to use all the tools at their disposal to gather the necessary data that will act as bedrock to economic and social advancement.

The way ahead

Fortunately there is already a shining model for success that governments across the developed world can imitate. The Global Strategy to improve agricultural and rural statistics, or GSARS, is the largest global effort to ensure reliable statistics in the field of agriculture. The strategy is founded upon three fundamental pillars:

  • Produce a minimum set of core data
  • Better integrate agriculture into the National Statistical Systems
  • Improve governance and statistical capacity building

There is absolutely no reason why these tenets cannot be applied beyond agriculture, to society and economics too.

To take a look at the GSARS Website, please click here.

It is imperative that governments find a way to gather and store information so that it may be used for the public good.

Rosalind Kainyah, MBE, Founder and Managing Director

To know more about our services, please click here

Read more Read less

Are your contractors managing the social impacts of their activities?

25|04|2016

Aligning social performance roles and responsibilities between project operators and their contractors is tough at the best of times. Project investors and operators are under increasing pressure to manage costs, and projects now deemed ‘uneconomic’ are collecting dust on a rather large shelf at headquarters. On the other side, contractors are facing fierce competition for the surviving projects with many squeezing their already tight profit margins just to keep a foot in the game.

Every day there seems to be another example of the challenges of managing the social performance issues associated with large capital infrastructure projects.  Many project operators have to navigate the complex dynamics of communities impacted by such projects, labour disputes, issues of human rights and the use of increasingly precious water, land and other natural resources.

In addition and increasingly, host Governments are enforcing more stringent local content requirements on project operators in an attempt to capture greater socio-economic benefits.  However, not all local suppliers have the capabilities of large international contractors and so the challenge becomes balancing local content requirements with high health, safety, environment and social standards.  The unfortunate truth is that a project operator will only ever be as good as the poorest performing contractor in their supply chain.

The business case for a more cohesive approach between operators and contractors has been well documented.  A 2011 executive briefing entitled ‘Shared Value, Share Responsibility’ by the International Institute on Environment and Development (IIED) clearly articulates both the challenges and actions required to improve performance in this area. IIED looked to the 2010 Macondo incident in the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate the enormous impacts which poor contractor management and supply chain coordination can have.

Whilst some might continue to argue that alignment on social performance issues between project operators and contractors is a ‘nice to have’, I believe it is essential.  After all, owners can ill afford projects that suffer cost and schedule over runs (or stop completely) as a result of community unrest – particularly when margins are so tight to begin with.  Getting it right from the outset has never been more important.

As a colleague recently reminded me, ‘social performance management is not core business, but it must be core to the business’.  I believe this sentiment also lends itself to the supply chain.  Just as a contractor’s health and safety performance is fundamental to a successful operation – whether drilling an exploration well, building a process facility or shopping center, or constructing a road – so too is their ability to understand and manage the social impacts and opportunities which come with that activity.

At Kina we understand that each operation and project will bring unique challenges that require unique solutions.  There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach that will bring about alignment and cohesiveness, but we offer a range of tools that can help both project operators and contractors better manage social challenges.  We help our clients prepare for and manage the social risks inherent in their supply chains but we also passionately believe in building capacity within the supply chain – helping local suppliers enhance their social performance capabilities.  This is good business and ultimately can only lead to better outcomes for project operators, contractors and host communities.

Trina Fahey, Partner

To know more about our services, please click here

To comment on the article, please click here

Read more Read less

A Japanese concept that sums up Kina’s ethos

21|04|2016

Have you ever heard of the Japanese concept of nemawashi? No? Neither had I till I spoke to a Japanese client of mine the other day. Nemawashi, she explained to me, is an informal process of quietly laying the foundation for some proposed change or project by talking to the people concerned, gathering support and getting feedback. The Japanese consider it a fundamental first step before any major change or project gets underway. Successful nemawashi means that changes can be carried out with the support and consent of all sides.

Building consensus

I think this neatly encapsulates the work Kina does for its clients. We help to build consensus and trust between the companies that want to invest in African countries, and the governments and societies that will influence or be affected by those investments. We prepare the ground for our clients and make sure that, from the very outset, business, government and society understand each other’s fundamental motivations and needs. A successful, long-term business cannot be built without this understanding – this nemawashi.

Going around the roots

The literal translation of nemawashi is “going around the roots”. It refers to the process whereby – before you transplant a tree – you gradually introduce soil to it from the new location. By doing so you get the tree accustomed to the new location, before you move it.

At Kina we “go around the roots” on behalf of our clients. We believe in a gradual process of acclimatising them to the countries in which they plan to operate. We help to forge links between them – ‘the company’, and the government and society in the countries where they wish to operate. These links are based on mutual understanding and respect.

Our triangular theory

We call this our triangular theory of doing business: It is founded on the idea that the key to unlocking long-term profits in African countries is to understand how governments, business and wider society interact with one another. It’s not just about having conversations with governments and society, it’s about having the right conversations. In fact, it’s all about nemawashi.

Rosalind Kainyah, MBE, Founder and Managing Director

To know more about our services, please click here

To comment on the article, please click here

Read more Read less

How to build a successful business in Africa

22|03|2016

Kina Advisory CEO, Rosalind Kainyah, explains the philosophy that drives the company, how it makes a difference to Kina’s clients, and what it takes to build a successful business in Africa.

 

What we are up to & News

22|07|2019

Cranfield Names Rosalind Kainyah in Top 50 “BAME” Female Leaders

The Kina Advisory team is delighted to announce that our Managing Director, Rosalind Kainyah, has been named as one of the top 50 Leading Females professionals of Black, Asian and other Minority Ethnic (BAME) women by Cranfield University.  The 50 inspiring women come from backgrounds historically under-represented in the senior leadership pipeline.  “Click Here” to read the full post

25|04|2019

Global Trade Review, West Africa 2019 and Rosalind Kainyah

Kina Advisory is delighted to confirm that Rosalind Kainyah, our Managing Director is one of the speakers at this year’s Global Trade Review, West Africa 2019.  Rosalind will be using her expertise to help explain the following, “What needs to be done to stimulate foreign direct investment in west Africa?”

In this interview conducted by Iyabode Soji-okusanya (Head Of Corporate Banking at Access Bank Plc) Rosalind will be touching on areas such as:

  • Ease of doing business: What are the main operational, financial and physical trade concerns for foreign investors?
  • Regulatory framework: To what extent is consistency an issue? Which West African markets and regulatory areas are of greatest concern? & What would investors like to see from regulators?
  • Physical infrastructure: To what extent is a lack of physical connectivity a barrier to fixed investment?
  • Who will be West Africa’s key partners in building a stronger, more resilient economy? What do investors see as the key areas of value they can bring to the region?

To see a full breakdown of the 2 day event, please click the below link.

Global Trade Review, West Africa 2019 and Rosalind Kainyah

10|01|2019

Aker Energy announces successful drilling offshore of Ghana

As a Non-Executive Director on the Board of Aker Energy, Rosalind Kainyah (Managing Director of Kina Advisory) is thrilled by the news of results of the first appraisal well drilled by Aker Energy offshore Ghana. The hard work begins but Rosalind is confident that Aker Energy will be an exemplary partner in Ghana – for the benefit of the country as a whole | To read the full press release, please click here. 

01|11|2018

Rosalind Kainyah | Arise Invest Interview About Cal Bank

MD of Kina Advisory, Rosalind Kainyah has been interviewed by Arise Invest,  Arise is a leading African investment company backed by three reputable cornerstone investors, namely Norfund, Rabobank, and FMO.  Rosalind has done many interviews relating to investing in Africa, but this article focuses on her role as a board member of Cal Bank, “what excites her about this role” & “why become involved with Cal bank”, as well as looking at her background. We hope you find the article enlightening (Click Here for the full Article).

12|10|2018

IWF Ghana | Generating Sustainable Wealth in Ghana

Rosalind Kainyah, Co-President of the International Women’s Forum Ghana (IWF Ghana) will be hosting the Forum’s first weekend retreat. With an all-female audience of around 50 Ghanian leaders, this retreat will focus on the common thread which binds the audience together: Generating Sustainable Wealth: How to create viable local companies which can become partners or suppliers to international companies in sectors like: oil & gas, mining, energy, construction and Infrastructure. Rosalind and other guest speakers will answer this question and many others from our business stand-point. (more…)