Insights

Kina Advisory provides insights on topical issues facing the industry today as companies operate and invest in Africa. Read through our latest thought pieces that give an insight into Kina’s way of thinking, as we discuss ideas that challenge the way business in Africa is conducted, offer solutions to those challenges and highlight the success of others.

 

Kina Advisory attends 2017 Ghana Presidential Inauguration

19|01|2017

Kina’s Managing Director, Rosalind Kainyah, MBE, attended the inauguration of President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, as the Fifth President of the Fourth Republic of Ghana on January 7th 2017.

Resplendent with a colourful representation of Ghana’s culture, the ceremony attracted heads of state from 14 African countries, including Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia and of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), and President Muhammadu Buhari of Nigeria. Ghana’s three living former presidents, including the outgoing, were all in attendance.

With the Black Star Square as venue, the event powerfully married Ghana’s history as a pioneer of the African liberation movement with its current reputation as a beacon of democracy on the continent.

In his inaugural address, President Akufo-Addo signaled an era of integrity in the public sector. “Public service is just that – service, and not an avenue for making money.  Money is to be made in the private sector, not the public,” he reminded Ghanaians.  In apparent reference to his campaign promise to build factories around the country, he also called on investors to take advantage of the opportunity to “Make in Ghana,” as he declared Ghana “open for business again.”

We at Kina congratulate the President and the First Lady, Rebecca Akufo-Addo. We have always been bullish about Ghana’s medium and long term economic prospects despite sputters in recent years. With the new government’s industrialization agenda based on light manufacturing and value-addition in agriculture, together with the promise of effective, efficient and honest governance, the short term too is brighter than previously thought. We are keen to do our part to match investors with business opportunities that support the country’s strategy for growth and development.  We will work with companies to assess and manage associated political, socio-economic, social, and environmental and governance factors and to play a transformative role in shaping Ghana’s future.

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Kina Advisory Breakfast Club | Inaugural Meeting

27|09|2016

Kina Advisory hosted its inaugural Kina Africa Breakfast Club meeting on 15 September 2016. We were delighted to have Anthony Pile, MBE, Founder and Chairman of Blue Skies as our guest speaker. With over 20 guests from varying backgrounds, an engaging and thought provoking conversation followed the dynamic, honest and challenging presentation from Anthony on the challenges and opportunities of working in countries in Africa.

The conversation began with Anthony describing how the business grew into the operation that it is today – with 9 factories across Africa, Europe and South America employing over 4,000 people and a turnover of $70m in 2015. Blue Skies has created an export business that not only adds to the economic growth of the operating countries, but does so in a sustainable way that relates to their core business objectives; earning the company numerous awards for their sustainable development. Anthony also described the business opportunities in agriculture in Africa and the need to encourage more investment and participation in the sector.

Conversation then turned to the on-the-ground challenges the company has and is facing in countries in Africa and in South America. Facing issues with land, fiscal policy changes, foreign currency exchange rates, and energy supply, Blue Skies has had to adapt to an ever changing environment whilst remaining firm to its core principles.  This has often required different and at times experimental methods to overcome some of these difficulties and turn them into opportunities – some still remain and are ongoing.

One of the key lessons from the conversation was the need to gather and fully understand as much on-the-ground and practical advice and information as possible before beginning any operation in a country. This should cover the political, economic, social, cultural and local business context; and understanding the impact these will inevitably have on the business.

Attendees also raised the important issue of the involvement of stakeholders.  Engaging with a broader range of stakeholders and educating them fully on your business/ project provides an important form of support when faced with some of the challenges mentioned.  It is therefore important to know how to have the right conversations with the right stakeholders and to develop plans of engagement early on.

Listening to Anthony speak it was clear that in spite of the challenges there is an optimism about the investment potential in Africa. There are solutions to the challenges, and one needs to be creative, flexible and committed to discover what they are.  With Anthony’s passion for the continent and commitment to see Africa thrive, we have no doubt that Blue Skies will continue to be a success.  We appreciated him spending a morning sharing his experiences and insights. This appreciation extends to our attendees who commented that they found the meeting ‘interesting’, ‘insightful’, and ‘informative’, praising Anthony’s open dialogue.

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Why ESG is an opportunity and not a cost to business

20|09|2016

Kina Advisory Founder and Managing Director, Rosalind Kainyah, explains why environmental, social and governance (ESG) strategies are an opportunity to businesses rather than a cost.

 

The ‘When’ and ‘What’ of a project Social Investment Strategy

13|09|2016

So you’ve got the government’s approval to build that road, mine, dam, power plant, or solar farm. Now what? Do you go ahead and build as is your legal right per the terms of your agreement? Many smart companies today have found that to be a not-so-smart move. What you have, in fact, are two sides of the stakeholder relationship triangle (See Kina Advisory’s Triangular Theory).

Before you go ahead, think ahead: Does the impacted community approve of the project? What are the community’s expectations? Can you meet those expectations? If not, then what? What is the capability of the industry regulator? What are the expected environmental and social impacts? What is the narrative about the project in the national discourse? What would be the impact of a change in government?

The answers to some of these questions can disrupt your elegant financial models. Larry Fink, the chief executive at BlackRock, the world’s biggest asset manager with US$4.6 trillion under management, knows this—environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues are core business issues. In a February 2016 letter to CEOs, he writes that ESG issues have real and quantifiable financial impacts.

Newmont, the world’s second biggest gold miner, knows this too. Despite a ruling by Peru’s Constitutional Court paving the way for the development of the Conga mine in that country, the miner had to walk away from the US$5 billion copper and gold project, unable to withstand violent opposition by the community.

So the need for a clear ESG strategy and the competent management of such is, thankfully, accepted wisdom among serious investors—we hope.

But how to do it?  In this piece, we focus on the ‘S’ of ESG and specifically on social investment plans and programmes.

If you begin thinking about stakeholder engagement, social impact management, and social investment issues after approval, you have waited too long. As investors race to help plug Africa’s US$90 billion annual infrastructure gap, and as companies lay the groundwork for a rebound in oil, gas, and mining, we at Kina Advisory see many companies struggle with the issue of the timing of such activities—when to do what. For instance, when to start consulting the community (without creating unrealistic expectations), when to announce a social investment program (before or after an election), and when to start implementing a social investment programme (before or after approval of a plan of development or power purchase agreement).

Tough questions, admittedly, with no easy answers. It’s a context-specific art, but one that must be grounded in information, best practices, and the connections, experience, and skills of specialists. To help investors, Kina Advisory has outlined suggested activities for the five main phases of a project.

Phase 1—Early development. During project identification and feasibility studies, an investor would need enough information to make a go/no-go decision. Here, activities would focus on investigating the ecosystem of the project: physical environment, political environment, economic environment, legal requirements, communities to be impacted, availability of skilled labor, and other critical issues. The information gathered can be used to begin to formulate a vision for social and economic contribution. Many governments now require that vision and related activities are part of project proposals – so social investment plans are becoming a compliance requirement. Even where they are not, any developer is well-served to articulate such in order to get a leg up. Besides, such a company gets a better grasp on managing risks. Conducting community consultations at this stage must be done tactfully so as not to raise expectations. Also, competitors may be conducting similar surveys, thereby overwhelming the community. An experienced advisor can estimate the nature and cost of managing such activities to help the investor make that go/no-go decision.

Phase 2—Advanced Development. Now is the time to begin executing some level of social investment or community investment programmes. It begins with more comprehensive consultation with stakeholders and a deeper understanding of the country’s economic development strategy.  Even where a company is using an external partner to assist in designing and implementing such programmes, developing in-house capacity would be critical. That would involve cultivating an internal mind-set that values partnership and underpins a more considered approach to stakeholder engagement.

Phase 3—Execution/ Construction. The construction stage is the first test of the robustness of the ESG strategy and management systems. It is the time to begin implementing some of the social investments to smooth the way for construction and related activities. Besides, as the project becomes tangible, its visibility increases and issues will come up that must be managed.

Phase 4—Operation. The operational phase should be one with a constant feedback loop, involving execution of the social investment programme, continuously listening for feedback, monitoring and evaluating programs, and correcting course when needed. In Ghana, for instance, years after a company started operating a plantation acquired from the State, local chiefs started making demands on the basis that customary practices had not been followed in the procurement of the land. But of course the only way to sustain any social investment is by maintaining operational excellence of the core business—while managing all the external forces.

Phase 5—Decommissioning. Often overlooked, the decommissioning process is important not only for the extractive industries. For many other industries, there are compliance issues to deal with. Programs may come to a halt, buildings may be abandoned, jobs would be lost, so it is never a frictionless process. Again, this phase begins with consultation with key stakeholders, especially the impacted community, including helping to identify alternative livelihoods. In many cases, partnerships must be forged to carry on with programs.

The array of actors and factors at play throughout the project lifecycle illustrate the need for a robust stakeholder engagement and communications strategy to underpin any social investment – and for that strategy to be adaptable to each stage. It is also critical for that strategy to include explaining to stakeholders the company’s core business and how it ties in with its social investment. This stops the social investment strategy from being seen simply as a ‘social wash’ PR plan.

While every situation is different these guidelines may be useful in helping companies understand their ESG needs at any phase in a project, and thereby avoid the misallocation of resources or opening themselves up to even more risk.

Trina Fahey, Partner

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What we are up to & News

22|07|2019

Cranfield Names Rosalind Kainyah in Top 50 “BAME” Female Leaders

The Kina Advisory team is delighted to announce that our Managing Director, Rosalind Kainyah, has been named as one of the top 50 Leading Females professionals of Black, Asian and other Minority Ethnic (BAME) women by Cranfield University.  The 50 inspiring women come from backgrounds historically under-represented in the senior leadership pipeline.  “Click Here” to read the full post

25|04|2019

Global Trade Review, West Africa 2019 and Rosalind Kainyah

Kina Advisory is delighted to confirm that Rosalind Kainyah, our Managing Director is one of the speakers at this year’s Global Trade Review, West Africa 2019.  Rosalind will be using her expertise to help explain the following, “What needs to be done to stimulate foreign direct investment in west Africa?”

In this interview conducted by Iyabode Soji-okusanya (Head Of Corporate Banking at Access Bank Plc) Rosalind will be touching on areas such as:

  • Ease of doing business: What are the main operational, financial and physical trade concerns for foreign investors?
  • Regulatory framework: To what extent is consistency an issue? Which West African markets and regulatory areas are of greatest concern? & What would investors like to see from regulators?
  • Physical infrastructure: To what extent is a lack of physical connectivity a barrier to fixed investment?
  • Who will be West Africa’s key partners in building a stronger, more resilient economy? What do investors see as the key areas of value they can bring to the region?

To see a full breakdown of the 2 day event, please click the below link.

Global Trade Review, West Africa 2019 and Rosalind Kainyah

10|01|2019

Aker Energy announces successful drilling offshore of Ghana

As a Non-Executive Director on the Board of Aker Energy, Rosalind Kainyah (Managing Director of Kina Advisory) is thrilled by the news of results of the first appraisal well drilled by Aker Energy offshore Ghana. The hard work begins but Rosalind is confident that Aker Energy will be an exemplary partner in Ghana – for the benefit of the country as a whole | To read the full press release, please click here. 

01|11|2018

Rosalind Kainyah | Arise Invest Interview About Cal Bank

MD of Kina Advisory, Rosalind Kainyah has been interviewed by Arise Invest,  Arise is a leading African investment company backed by three reputable cornerstone investors, namely Norfund, Rabobank, and FMO.  Rosalind has done many interviews relating to investing in Africa, but this article focuses on her role as a board member of Cal Bank, “what excites her about this role” & “why become involved with Cal bank”, as well as looking at her background. We hope you find the article enlightening (Click Here for the full Article).

12|10|2018

IWF Ghana | Generating Sustainable Wealth in Ghana

Rosalind Kainyah, Co-President of the International Women’s Forum Ghana (IWF Ghana) will be hosting the Forum’s first weekend retreat. With an all-female audience of around 50 Ghanian leaders, this retreat will focus on the common thread which binds the audience together: Generating Sustainable Wealth: How to create viable local companies which can become partners or suppliers to international companies in sectors like: oil & gas, mining, energy, construction and Infrastructure. Rosalind and other guest speakers will answer this question and many others from our business stand-point. (more…)